Blog, Poetry, Tutorial

No Time for Rhyme? Tips for Writing Free Verse

Hello. So, before I start the post, let me give you a few updates. First, I did not get a call about either of the two interviews I gave last month. I am now taking a break from applying for copywriting jobs, and focussing on applying for teaching jobs instead. This is something I do once every two or three months, to keep my morale up and avoid boredom. If you recently got a job in either of the two fields, please let me know what you did right. Haha. Second, my husband got the most unique 40th birthday present – a positive Covid-test. He is fine, thankfully, and so are my kids and I. There’s just been a lot of self-isolation going on, so I couldn’t post for a while. Third, I closed my RedBubble shop. Despite good feedback, and intermittent Instagram promotions, I did not manage to get a lot of follows or make even a single sale. Since I made two sales on Etsy, I wanted to make sure I’m able to spend enough time promoting Etsy, rather than trying to juggle two things art once.

Now, back to the topic. So, I love rhyme, but I do not always have the time or energy for it. On days like these, and depending on the subject matter, I like to write free verse. Free verse is verse free from the bounds of fixed meter patterns. So, simplistically put, a poem without a consistent rhyme scheme. Now, how do you add rhythm to a poem without using rhyming words? These are some of the tricks I use:

  1. Title – Make the title of the poem poetic. Use a poetic device in the title itself, or make it imaginative. Let me give you the example of my poem “When Two Become One”. I wrote it a while back, after a minor argument with my husband. Yes, that’s what poets do! They write a poem, no matter what the situation. So, this title portrays an image of coming together and has a romantic ring to it.
  2. Alliteration – Alliteration is repeating the consonant sound at the beginning of a few consecutive words in a sentence. For example, take a line from my poem. “I take pleasure in pleasing people…” Do you notice the repetition of the “p” sound? That is alliteration. It emphasizes an idea and creates a good listening effect, don’t you agree?
  3. Imagery – Creating pictures with words, particularly those that have a sensory effect, are particularly effective in making poetry poetic. “Let’s melt all our ironies into a single paradox…Let’s walk hand in hand.” These are examples of using words to create an image in the reader’s mind. Let the reader see that you’re walking hand in hand. Let the reader feel the ironies melting into each other like a mocha chocolate bomb melting under hot milk in a mug…Oops! Sorry, foodie alert!
  4. Idioms – Idioms are groups of words that have come to possess a meaning in the collective mindset that is different from their literal meaning. “Let’s walk hand in hand towards the evening of our lives.” Here, the evening of our lives means old age, a meaning that literature has popularized, over the years.
  5. Repetition – This is my favourite device, especially while writing free verse. Repeat a word, a phrase or a line and notice the effect it creates. It can help drive a point home, while also creating a unique listening effect. It is used quite commonly in popular songs, as well. Can you think of a favourite song that plays the same line over and over? Doesn’t that line stick to your memory more easily than the other lines, playing in your mind like a broken record?
  6. Dramatic effect – A little exaggeration of emotion, a little bit of word play – techniques such as these create a dramatic effect that works well in poetry. “By an unknown twist of fate…” is used to describe something as mundane as a husband and wife getting used to each other after a few years of living together, in my poem. Also, pay attention to flow by using lines of varied lengths and dividing a sentence into lines such that it sounds rhythmic.

What are some of the techniques you use to make your free verse poetic? Do you like rhyme better or free verse, both as a writer and as a reader? Let me know through the comments section of the post. If you’d like to participate in a one-on-one poetry workshop, get in touch through my contact page. I also offer poetry editing and proofreading services. If you’d like to buy the poem discussed in this post as a scroll, please visit my Etsy shop or the Shop on this website for pricing details.

©️Pebble in the Ocean 2021

Blog, Tutorial

How I Write a Poem – A Step-by-Step Tutorial

Before I start this post, let me tell you a bit about myself. I am Deepti, a writer since the age of 5. That is when I wrote my first poem. Since then, I completed my Ph.D. in English, taught English, worked as a copywriter, started a website, shut it down, worked as a freelancer, started another website and opened an Etsy shop, not particularly in that order. During this time, I kept writing short stories and poems, and got them published in online magazines, literary journals, websites, and several other platforms (yes, I love the Oxford comma).

A few years ago, I started writing poems for special occasions like milestone birthdays, anniversaries and more, and making posters out of them. Everyone I gave them to, loved the gift as it was unique, as gifting words hasn’t really picked up as a trend for some reason. When the pandemic started, I realized that it became even more important to change that, because when we don’t get to see each other, when we are living life between lockdowns, the soothing effect of words begins to seem more comforting than any thing we may buy or get. If you think that words matter, and that now is the time to declare our feelings for each other, visit my Etsy shop.

Now, even though I have been writing across forms and styles, writing poems continues to be my favourite. I like writing free verse better as I find that I have more freedom that way, but rhyme is equally my cup of (Poe)t(r)ea! Did you see what I did there? With my cup of poetry? Okay, I agree it wasn’t as funny as it seemed when I came up with it. So, moving on. Here’s how I write a poem.

The Process

Step 1 – Choose a topic

These days, I have been seeing a lot of people without a home. I see them on the streets, in the lobby of office buildings, and any place they can find to protect themselves from the harshness of the cold weather here. That has made me feel even more grateful that I have a roof over my head, a place to keep me warm and safe from the sometimes cruel weather. So, I decided I want to express this gratitude by writing a poem about my home.

So, I choose home as the topic of my poem.

Step 2 – Let the topic brew in your mind

Now, after I have the topic ready, I need to choose the direction in which I can take my poem. My idea is to express my gratitude for my home. So, I think about all the things I’m grateful for, related to my home. I let the topic brew in my head for a few days, even making up lines as I go. If I am using rhyme, I usually consult a thesaurus to have access to synonyms that either sound better or rhyme with the words I have in mind.

So, coming back to my topic. The things I am thankful for are:

  1. My house is my home.
  2. It is my safe haven.
  3. It brings me warmth.
  4. It brings me light from the moon.
  5. I make memories here with people I love.
  6. It is the vessel where I receive everything my universe has to offer.

Step 3 – Start forming lines in your mind

Now that I know what ideas I want to include, I can start writing my poem. As I said, I have a thesaurus close by, to make sure I can find rhyming words easily. I write the poem in my mind first, and sit down to write when I have at least five lines ready.

Step 4 – Read aloud and revise

After writing down my first draft, I read it aloud to check flow, to see how the poem sounds (that is the most important thing to me while writing, and especially while writing poetry). While writing the first draft, I decided I want to write it as a prayer that can be given as a housewarming present. You can find the final version on my Etsy shop.

Home Sweet Home

May your house become your home

And safe haven, too.

May it bring to you warmth from the sun

And soft glow from the moon.


May you find true happiness here,

With love, laughter and cheer.

May you make happy memories, too,

With those you hold dear.


May your house bring you all these joys

And perhaps a million more.

May it bring you all the good fortune

The universe has in store.

So, if you’re new to writing poetry and you write something following these steps, please share your work with me by email. If you have your own process, and would like to share it with others, please write your comment below, or get in touch through my contact page.

I also offer one-on-one writing workshops, as well as editing services. Contact me for details.

©️Pebble in the Ocean 2021

Blog, Tutorial

How to Turn Kids’ Art into Posters

I am really excited about sharing this post, as I really liked the results of this task. I have been using Canva for some time now, especially for personal projects, and I love it. After finishing up with painting with my kids, I sat down on Canva and turned their art into posters.

The process is quite simple actually.

  1. Just sign up for Canva. I use the free version, and I do it on the Canva app on my iPad, so that’s what I will be talking about here.

2. Once you’re logged in, choose Create a Design on top of the page. I usually choose poster or A4 document, but you can choose whichever design you wish to create.

3. Next, find Camera Roll. On my iPad, it appears under More on the sidebar towards the left of the page. (Before this step, click a picture of your kid’s artwork and make the necessary edits to it. Then, save it on the device on which you plan to use Canva.)

4. After clicking on Camera Roll, choose the picture you wish to turn into a poster. It will appear on the design page. Crop it and adjust the size to suit your purpose and clear out any unwanted spots or marks.

5. Next, click on Filter and choose whichever filter you like for the painting. I chose Peony because it gave it a pink tinge and made the colours pop. I used full intensity for the filter. You can easily change it if you want it to be less intense.

6. Next, I clicked on the ellipsis next to effects and changed the transparency of the painting. I adjusted it to make sure the text I was about to write was visible clearly on the poster.

7. Next, click on Text on the sidebar, and choose Add a heading and whichever font style and size you like. I chose the text to match my 2-year old’s personality.

I made two posters with two paintings made by my kids. This is what they look like.


Let me know if you try doing this with your kid’s artwork. It’s a whole lot of fun and a great way to preserve your kids’ creative creations.